What: All Issues : War & Peace : Military Spending, General : (H.R. 1) On an amendment that would have cut 5.5% of all federal non-military spending—and11% of all legislative branch spending (which funded the operations of Congress) from a “continuing resolution” which funded the federal government through September 2011. (2011 house Roll Call 103)
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(H.R. 1) On an amendment that would have cut 5.5% of all federal non-military spending—and11% of all legislative branch spending (which funded the operations of Congress) from a “continuing resolution” which funded the federal government through September 2011.
house Roll Call 103     Feb 18, 2011
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Win
Qualifies as polarizing?
Yes
Is this vote crucial?
No

This was a vote on an amendment by Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) that would have cut 5.5% of all non-military spending and 11% of all legislative branch spending (which funded the operations of Congress) from a “continuing resolution” which funded the federal government through September 2011.

Rep. Joe Walsh (R-IL) supported this amendment: “We are broke. We are $14 trillion in debt, and we know it's more than that. By 2014, in interest on the debt alone, we will spend more than we will on all non-discretionary spending except for defense. By 2014, every citizen in the United States will spend $2,500 just to pay interest on the debt. I appreciate the leadership the Republican leadership has provided in being as bold as they can be on necessary, important spending cuts; but…we've got to have faith in the American people. They are ahead of us on this. They are ready. This is one of those rare moments when the American people are asking us to be bold, when they are asking us to go one step further.”
 
Rep. Norm Dicks (D-WA) opposed the amendment arguing it used a “meat ax approach.” Rep. Hal Rogers (R-KY) said: “…Rather than make careful decisions on specific programs, the…amendment hits everything indiscriminately and in a heavy-handed way. We were elected to make choices, not run on automatic pilot.”

The House rejected this amendment by a vote of 147-281. Voting “yea” were 147 Republicans. All 189 Democrats present and 92 Republicans voted “nay.” As a result, the House rejected an amendment that would have cut 5.5% of all non-military spending and 11% of legislative branch spending from a continuing resolution.

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