What: All Issues : Aid to Less Advantaged People, at Home & Abroad : America's Poor : (H.R. 1) Final passage of legislation funding the federal government through September 2011 and cutting $61 billion in federal funding for government programs, including food stamps (which provide nutritional assistance to the poor), community health centers, Pell Grants for low–income college students, and funding for state job training programs (2011 house Roll Call 147)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
(H.R. 1) Final passage of legislation funding the federal government through September 2011 and cutting $61 billion in federal funding for government programs, including food stamps (which provide nutritional assistance to the poor), community health centers, Pell Grants for low–income college students, and funding for state job training programs
house Roll Call 147     Feb 19, 2011
Member's Vote
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Progressive Position
Progressive Result
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This was vote on final passage of legislation funding the federal government (such bills are known as “continuing resolutions, or “CRs”) through September 2011, and cutting $61 billion in federal funding for many government programs.  For example, the bill cut funding from environmental protection programs, food stamps—which provide nutritional assistance to the poor—as well as community health centers, scientific research, Pell Grants for low–income college students, the National Institutes of Health, federal aid for state law enforcement programs, and funding for state job training programs.

The bill also prohibited its funding from being to implement a major health care reform law enacted in 2010. That measure expanded health care coverage to more than 30 million uninsured Americans and prohibited health insurance companies from denying coverage to people with pre-existing medical conditions.

Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY) urged support for the bill: “The continuing resolution on the floor today represents the largest reduction in non-security discretionary spending [spending that does not include Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security] in the history of the nation. It funds the federal government for the remainder of the 2011 fiscal year, but, most importantly… it answers taxpayers' callings to right our nation's fiscal ship, making specific, substantive and comprehensive spending reductions…This bill is about shared commitments and shared sacrifice. Make no mistake: these cuts will not be easy, and they will affect every congressional district. But they are necessary and long overdue.“

Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) also supported the bill: “…If we want to have jobs today, if we want to protect our children from bankruptcy tomorrow, we've got to quit spending money we don't have. There is a debt crisis in America, and it is spending driven, being led by the president and other friends from the other side of the aisle. It is a true crisis.”

Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) opposed the bill: “Democrats are committed to reducing the deficit. We believe, as taxpayers do, that we should start by ending tax subsidies and special interest waste. We should be slashing oil companies' subsidies first. We must make programs accountable and end the ones that do not work. We can no longer afford to continue the tax breaks for the top 2 percent of the country. Republicans are in a reckless rush to slash without regard to the impact on our economy, on the businesses which create jobs or on middle class or working families who are being responsible, doing the best for their families and educating for the future.”

Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) also opposed the bill: “Sadly, the Republican leaders have brought to the floor a continuing resolution that jeopardizes American jobs and our economic future by rolling back investments that will help our private sector grow and put people back to work. It thoughtlessly makes extreme cuts to appease an extreme wing of their party, at the expense of the American people.”

The House passed this bill by a vote of 235-189. Voting “yea” were 235 Republicans. All 186 Democrats and 3 Republicans voted “nay.” As a result, the House passed legislation funding the federal government through September 2011 and cutting $61 billion in federal funding for government programs, including food stamps, community health centers, Pell Grants—and prohibiting its fund from being used for the implementation of a major health care reform law enacted in 2010. The Senate however, had scheduled no action on the bill. In addition, President Obama had threatened to veto the measure.

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Key: Y=Yea, N=Nay, W=Win, L=Loss