What: All Issues : Environment : (H.R. 1) On an amendment prohibiting federal funds from being allocated to the United Nations panel on climate change. (2011 house Roll Call 132)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

(H.R. 1) On an amendment prohibiting federal funds from being allocated to the United Nations panel on climate change.
house Roll Call 132     Feb 18, 2011
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss
Qualifies as polarizing?
Yes
Is this vote crucial?
No

This was a vote on an amendment by Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO) prohibiting federal funds from being allocated to the United Nations panel on climate change—the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC. (The IPCC, along with former Vice President Al Gore, won the Nobel Peace Prize for their work on climate change in 2007.) This amendment was offered to a continuing resolution funding the federal government through September 2011, and cutting $61 billion in federal funding for many government programs.

Luetkemeyer urged support for his amendment: “…This amendment would prohibit U.S. contributions to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an entity that is fraught with waste and engaged in dubious science. The IPCC advises governments around the world on climate change…if the families in my district have been able to tighten their belts, then surely the federal government can do the same and stop funding an organization that is fraught with waste and abuse. My amendment simply says that no funds in this bill can go toward the IPCC. This would save taxpayers millions of dollars this year and millions of dollars in years to come….Our constituents should not have to continue to foot the bill for an organization to keep producing corrupt findings that were used as justification to impose a massive new tax on every American. They deserve better.”

Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA) opposed the amendment: “The U.S. contributes only $2.3 million to the IPCC, and our $2.3 million contribution leverages a global science assessment institution with global outreach and global technical input, a process we could not carry out alone and one that could come to a halt without U.S. support. Their work on climate change is unparalleled. In its four assessment reports to date, they have brought together thousands of scientists around the world in disciplines ranging from atmospheric science, to forest ecology, to economics to provide objective and policy neutral information. The panel has attracted hundreds of the best U.S. scientists. In fact, a majority of the research that's reviewed is undertaken in U.S. institutions.”

The House agreed to this amendment by a vote of 244-179. Voting “yea” were 235 Republicans and 9 Democrats. 176 Democrats and 3 Republicans voted “nay.” As a result, the House agreed to an amendment prohibiting funds provided by a “continuing resolution”  (which funded the federal government through September 2011, and cut $61 billion in federal funding for many government programs) from being allocated to the United Nations panel on climate change—the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, or IPCC.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name