What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : (H.R. 1682) Legislation (known as a “continuing resolution,” or “CR”) to keep all government agencies and programs operating through December 3, 2010 – On the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to the bill (2010 house Roll Call 560)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
(H.R. 1682) Legislation (known as a “continuing resolution,” or “CR”) to keep all government agencies and programs operating through December 3, 2010 – On the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to the bill
house Roll Call 560     Sep 29, 2010
Member's Vote
(progressive
or not)
Progressive Position
Progressive Result
(win or loss)

This was a vote on a resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to legislation to keep all government agencies and programs operating through December 3, 2010. (Such measures are known as a “continuing resolutions,” or “CRs.”) Democratic leaders brought up this bill in the House of Representatives shortly before adjourning in advance of the 2010 midterm elections.

 [Congress generally votes on 12 separate spending bills (referred to as “appropriations bills”) each year. These bills fund the federal government’s various agencies and departments (such as the Education Department, the Agriculture Department, etc.) and most government programs. Since Congress had not passed any of these 12 bills, legislation to fund government operations on a short-term basis was required.]

The minority party (in the case, Republicans) generally opposes short term funding bills, and argues that such measures amount to admission by the majority party that it cannot govern. Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-NY) warned Republicans not to “demagogue” the bill and urged support for the legislation: “…We are here tonight to…to maintain a level and consistent funding stream for the government. It is an easy issue to demagogue, and it is my hope that everybody will work together now and quickly move this bill to passage and to the President's desk.”

Rep. David Dreier (R-CA) urged opposition to the resolution and the underlying bill: “Apparently, the House is wrapping up its business tonight, adjourning early for the campaign season. Our final act will be the passage of this continuing resolution, made necessary by this majority's many, many failures…. They [the Democratic majority] did not complete work on a single appropriations bill. And to make matters worse, they are leaving town with a tax hike looming for the American people….this is not a record of which to be proud.”

The House agreed to the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to the short-term funding bill by a vote of 233-191. 233 Democrats voted “yea.” 172 Republicans and 19 Democrats voted “nay.” As a result, the House proceeded to formal floor debate on Legislation to keep all government agencies and programs operating through December 3, 2010.

N Y W
Issue Areas:
Key: Y=Yea, N=Nay, W=Win, L=Loss