What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : (H.R. 1682) Legislation (known as a “continuing resolution,” or “CR”) to keep all government agencies and programs operating through December 3, 2010 – On bringing to a final vote the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to the bill (2010 house Roll Call 559)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
(H.R. 1682) Legislation (known as a “continuing resolution,” or “CR”) to keep all government agencies and programs operating through December 3, 2010 – On bringing to a final vote the resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to the bill
house Roll Call 559     Sep 29, 2010
Member's Vote
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or not)
Progressive Position
Progressive Result
(win or loss)

This was a procedural vote on a resolution setting a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to legislation to keep all government agencies and programs operating through December 3, 2010. (Such measures are known as a “continuing resolutions,” or “CRs.”) If passed, this particular procedural motion -- known as the “previous question" -- effectively ends debate and brings the pending legislation to an immediate vote.Democratic leaders brought up this bill in the House of Representatives shortly before adjourning in advance of the 2010 midterm elections.

 [Congress generally votes on 12 separate spending bills each year. These bills fund the federal government’s various agencies and departments (such as the Education Department, the Agriculture Department, etc.) and most government programs. Since Congress had not passed any of these 12 bills, legislation to fund government operations on a short-term basis was required.]

Rep. Louise Slaughter (D-NY) urged support for the resolution, and argued that Congress almost always has to use short-term funding bills (known as “continuing resolutions,” or a “CR”) to keep the government operating:
“No one should be surprised with the CR. With the exception of…1989, 1995 and 1997, one continuing resolution at least has been enacted for each…year since 1955. In the 12 years that Republicans controlled the House, CRs were enacted 84 separate times. As in previous years, we are extending funding with a CR…”

Rep. David Dreier (R-CA) urged members to oppose the previous question motion. If the motion was defeated, Dreier indicated he would seek to amend the resolution (which set a time limit for debate and determining which amendments could be offered to the short-term funding bill) to allow a vote on a Republican proposal to reduce government spending to 2008 levels: “We can have a vote on a responsible level of spending, sending a powerful signal that we will work together to get our fiscal house in order… if we are successful in defeating the previous question, we will offer a…[proposal to return] to the 2008 spending levels.”

The House agreed to the previous question motion by a vote of 240-186. 240 Democrats voted “yea.” 173 Republicans and 13 Democrats voted “nay.” As a result, the House proceeded to a final vote on legislation to keep all government agencies and programs operating through December 3, 2010 (and did not proceed to a vote on a Republican proposal to reduce government spending to 2008 levels).

N Y W
Issue Areas:
Key: Y=Yea, N=Nay, W=Win, L=Loss