What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : (H.R. 5175) On an amendment to a campaign finance reform bill that required the funders of a political television advertisement to include the city and state of their place of residence or principal place of business in the advertise advertisement’s “disclaimer” (in which the funder of the ad acknowledges financing it) (2010 house Roll Call 389)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
(H.R. 5175) On an amendment to a campaign finance reform bill that required the funders of a political television advertisement to include the city and state of their place of residence or principal place of business in the advertise advertisement’s “disclaimer” (in which the funder of the ad acknowledges financing it)
house Roll Call 389     Jun 24, 2010
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This was a vote on an amendment by Rep. Patrick J. Murphy (D-PA) to a campaign finance reform bill that that required the funders of political television advertisements to include the city and state of their place of residence or principal place of business in the advertisement’s disclaimer. The “disclaimer” refers to the portion of the advertisement in which its funder acknowledges financing it.

Murphy urged support for his amendment: “By knowing where the money is coming from, people will have a better understanding of who the funder is and the motivations behind an ad. This is not a Democratic or a Republican idea. All citizens deserve to know if a special interest completely unrelated to their districts and to the issues that affect their daily lives is trying to influence their elections.”

Rep. Dan Lungren (R-CA) argued the amendment would impose an onerous requirement on political advertising, and require their disclaimers to be unrealistically long: “By the additional disclaimers required on broadcast ads, we have already determined that, in some cases, very easily, one would have to use 15 to 17 seconds of a 15- or a 30-second ad to make the disclaimer. If you add additional requirements, as the gentleman suggests, you could have as much as 20 seconds, which will mean that you won't be able to do 15-second ads.”

The House agreed to Murphy’s amendment by a vote of 274-152. 243 Democrats and 31 Republicans voted “yea.” 140 Republicans and 12 Democrats voted “nay.” As a result, the House agreed to an amendment to a campaign finance bill that required the funders of political television advertisements to include the city and state of their place of residence or principal place of business in the advertisement’s disclaimer.

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