What: All Issues : Aid to Less Advantaged People, at Home & Abroad : America's Poor : HR 2. (Children’s health insurance program) Motion to rewrite a State Children’s Health Insurance Program bill to authorize the program for longer but require more eligibility hurdles for certain applicants/On the motion (2009 house Roll Call 15)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
HR 2. (Children’s health insurance program) Motion to rewrite a State Children’s Health Insurance Program bill to authorize the program for longer but require more eligibility hurdles for certain applicants/On the motion
house Roll Call 15     Jan 14, 2009
Member's Vote
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or not)
Progressive Position
Progressive Result
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This vote was on a motion to send a bill reauthorizing the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) back to the Energy and Commerce Committee for a rewrite (known as “motion to recommit”).  Nathan Deal, R-Ga., wanted the committee to add language that would expand the bill to seven years, and require states to insure 90 percent of children in families with incomes under 200 percent of the poverty level before the program could be expanded to cover families with higher levels of income than are currently eligible.  Deal also wanted the committee to stiffen eligibility restrictions for both legal and illegal immigrants, as well as paying for the $60 billion expansion by making some changes to the corporate tax code. 

The language offered by Deal was identical to that contained in an amendment that he had sought to offer to the bill, but could not.

“Unlike the bill that is under consideration … the motion to recommit puts poor children first by holding States accountable for not finding and enrolling their low-income, uninsured children,” Deal said. 

Frank Pallone, D-N.J., said Deal’s motion would undermine the entire essence of the SCHIP bill by cutting out those of moderate income whose health care costs have risen so astronomically that they also can barely afford care for their kids.

“Unfortunately, the reality of today is that these moderate income families who would be excluded under this motion are struggling to make ends meet, too. Health costs have been rising much faster than income over the past decade. A family at 300 percent of poverty, for example, earning $52,800 a year—these so-called rich folks, according to Republicans—now spend an average of 19 percent of their income on premiums for employer-sponsored coverage if they even have access to it. Ten years ago, that same family was only spending 11 percent of income on premiums for their employer plan,” Pallone said.

By a vote of 179-247, the motion was rejected.  All but three Republicans present voted for the motion.  All but five Democrats present voted against the motion.  The end result is that the motion to change the bill to require more eligibility hurdles except for the poorest of families was rejected.

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