What: All Issues : Making Government Work for Everyone, Not Just the Rich or Powerful : H.R. 1817. Homeland Security/Vote on Democratic Substitute Amendment to Bill Authorizing the Department of Homeland Security. (2005 house Roll Call 187)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
H.R. 1817. Homeland Security/Vote on Democratic Substitute Amendment to Bill Authorizing the Department of Homeland Security.
house Roll Call 187     May 18, 2005
Member's Vote
(progressive
or not)
Progressive Position
Progressive Result
(win or loss)

In this vote, the House rejected a Democratic substitute amendment offered by Bennie Thompson (D-MS) to H.R. 1817. (A substitute amendment is an amendment whose language is intended to replace wholly the language of the underlying bill.) H.R. 1817 was a bill to authorize the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the first bill brought by Congress to exercise its oversight authority since the Department's inception. Taking the Progressive position, Thompson argued that H.R. 1817 would leave dangerous gaps in America's national security, including "gaps in chemical plants, aviation, railroads, passenger trains and railroads, buses, border security, the ability of first responders to communicate in an emergency, the importance of protecting privacy, and a whole host of other areas where we must improve security." Democrats in particular expressed concerns about what they perceived to be the bill's failure to address adequately security at chemical plants and the question of screening cargo on passenger jets. Thompson further argued that his substitute amendment would address those gaps in a number of ways, including authorizing substantial additional funds for areas of homeland security that he characterized as either inadequately addressed or not addressed at all in the bill. Republicans countered that Thompson's Democratic substitute amendment would interfere with management decisions within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and would spend $7 billion more than was necessary for DHS's functions. They also felt that the substitute language did not adequately address intelligence issues or the problem of preventing a nuclear terrorist attack. Progressives were defeated when the House voted down this substitute amendment 196 to 230, in a virtually party-line vote. Thus, the House proceeded to vote on the DHS authorization bill with what many Democrats believed to be important security gaps intact.

N Y L
Issue Areas:
Key: Y=Yea, N=Nay, W=Win, L=Loss