What: All Issues : Aid to Less Advantaged People, at Home & Abroad : America's Poor : H. Res. 235. Small Business/Procedural Vote for the Governing Rule on H. Res. 22, a Resolution Expressing the Sense of the Congress that U.S. Small Business Owners Are Entitled to a Small Business Bill of Rights. (2005 house Roll Call 138)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
H. Res. 235. Small Business/Procedural Vote for the Governing Rule on H. Res. 22, a Resolution Expressing the Sense of the Congress that U.S. Small Business Owners Are Entitled to a Small Business Bill of Rights.
house Roll Call 138     Apr 27, 2005
Member's Vote
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Progressive Position
Progressive Result
(win or loss)

In this vote, the House approved the rule governing consideration of H. Res. 22, a resolution expressing the Sense of the Congress (a nonbinding resolution) that U.S. small business owners are entitled to a Small Business Bill of Rights. (A rule sets forth what amendments House members may offer, how much time each side will be permitted to speak, how long the debate can last, etc. A vote on the rule usually reflects existing support and opposition for the underlying legislation and/or loyalty to one's party.) Democrats, including Progressives, protested that the majority party in Congress-the Republicans-had "muted debate on a piece of legislation for no legitimate reason." (Doris Matsui (D-CA).) Republicans had shut down debate after rejecting several Democratic amendments when the resolution was first considered in the Small Business Committee, and then the Rules Committee had issued a rule that prohibited anyone-including Democrats-from offering amendments on the House floor. Democrats maintained that their amendments would have included important priorities for U.S. small businesses, including "strengthen[ing] programs for minority entrepreneurs," and supporting a microloan program that the Administration had eliminated in its budget proposal. (Matsui.) Republicans focused their debate on what small businesses needed to thrive in the U.S., what had been done already by Congress toward meeting those needs-like passing the elimination of the estate tax and The Energy Policy Act of 2005-and what still needed to be done; for example, stemming the rising cost to small businesses of providing health insurance for their employees. They also asserted that the Democrats had had ample opportunity to air their concerns and make amendments to the legislation in committee. Finally, they asserted that anyone who opposed this Small Business Bill of Rights would by definition be in favor of: "higher health insurance costs, higher taxes, more frivolous lawsuits, more paper work and red tape, higher energy costs, more obstacles to getting capital and more obstacles to getting government contracts." (Rick Keller (R-FL).) This vote was actually a procedural one to "order the previous question" on the rule for the resolution, meaning that winning the vote meant ending debate, preventing further amendments and proceeding immediately to a vote on the rule. Progressives were defeated when the House voted 228 to 201 along straight party lines to order the previous question on the governing rule for the Sense of the Congress resolution in support of a Small Business Bill of Rights. Thus, they voted to override Democratic procedural concerns and to move to the next step toward passage of a resolution in favor of a Small Business Bill of Rights.

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Key: Y=Yea, N=Nay, W=Win, L=Loss