What: All Issues : Aid to Less Advantaged People, at Home & Abroad : America's Poor : H.R. 27. Jobs/Procedural Vote on Motion to Recommit to Committee with Instructions a Bill to Reauthorize Federal Job-Training Programs. (2005 house Roll Call 47)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
H.R. 27. Jobs/Procedural Vote on Motion to Recommit to Committee with Instructions a Bill to Reauthorize Federal Job-Training Programs.
house Roll Call 47     Mar 02, 2005
Member's Vote
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Progressive Position
Progressive Result
(win or loss)

In this vote, the House defeated a motion to recommit to committee with instructions H.R. 27, a bill to reauthorize federal job-training programs. (A motion to recommit to committee with instructions means to send back to committee with instructions to take a specific action. This motion is often a last attempt by the opponents of a bill to kill or amend substantively the pending legislation.) Offered by Dale Kildee (D-MI), the motion would have added language to the bill providing additional assistance to veterans and individuals whose jobs have been outsourced to other countries. Progressives argued that veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan deserve more assistance than the language in H.R. 27 would provide, and that the outsourcing of American jobs to other countries is a "crisis" touching "every community in the United States." (Rosa DeLauro (D-CT).) Republicans countered that the motion to recommit was unnecessary because the U.S. economy is strong, jobs are being created, and that veterans and workers whose jobs have been outsourced already have access to services to help them find new jobs. In general, Progressives opposed the job-training bill itself because it would "block-grant" numerous job-training programs for veterans, the disabled, youth and others (i.e., eliminate and send funds previously authorized under the programs to the states to be used in a discretionary manner). In addition, Progressives contended that the bill would authorize religious institutions to receive federal job-training funds while permitting them to discriminate in their hiring on the basis of religion, which they claimed could lead to federally prohibited discrimination on other grounds such as race or gender. Republicans countered that the job-training bill would make the Workforce Investment Act more efficient and more relevant to the skills needed for employment in the 21st century. (The Workforce Investment Act is a law passed in 1998 to create federal programs to provide veterans, migrant workers, youth and others with the skills they need to find jobs.) They further argued that the bill actually eliminated religious discrimination by putting religious organizations on the same level as other groups with respect to being permitted to apply for and receive federal funding. Democrats, including Progressives, lost this motion in a straight party-line vote of 197 to 228; thus, additional jobs assistance for veterans and workers whose jobs had been outsourced was kept out of the bill.

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