What: All Issues : Fair Taxation : Tax Breaks for the Rich : A vote on final passage by the full House of the Republican "Marriage Penalty Relief Act" (HR 4181) would permanently eliminate the so-called marriage penalty by making the standard tax deduction for married couples double that of single taxpayers to the tune of $105 billion over 10 years. (2004 house Roll Call 138)
 Who: All Members
[POW!]
 

To find out how your Members of Congress voted on this bill, use the form on the right.

A vote on final passage by the full House of the Republican "Marriage Penalty Relief Act" (HR 4181) would permanently eliminate the so-called marriage penalty by making the standard tax deduction for married couples double that of single taxpayers to the tune of $105 billion over 10 years.
house Roll Call 138     Apr 28, 2004
Progressive Position:
Nay
Progressive Result:
Loss

The "Marriage Penalty Relief Act" (HR 4181) backed by President Bush was easily approved by the full House by a 323-95 vote, notwithstanding progressives' efforts to defeat it. The bill would permanently eliminate the so-called marriage penalty by making the standard tax deduction for married couples double that of single taxpayers. It also would make permanent higher income limits for married couples eligible to receive the refundable earned-income tax credit. The bill carries a $105 billion price tag over 10 years. Progressives agreed with conservatives insofar as "no one in this body believes ... it is fair" that married individuals should have to pay more taxes than if you were single or filing separately, the debate on HR 4181 was actually over whether Congress should continue to finance tax cuts out of Social Security and Medicare. With the budget deficit this year already more than half a trillion dollars, passage of this bill will only make matters worse, progressives argued. Progressives instead supported a Democratic substitute, offered by Rep. Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.) that they said would provide more than twice as much tax relief without threatening economic growth, and would be paid for through corresponding revenue raisers elsewhere in the budget that would be borne by the rich. However, conservatives cast progressives' objections to the Republican bill as an objection to remedying the marriage penalty, and emphasized the importance of making this relief a permanent part of the tax code. Married working couples will be able to use this tax relief to benefit their families, which always helps the economy, conservatives argued.

Issue Areas:

Find your Member of
Congress' votes

Select by Name