What: All Issues : War & Peace : Military Spending, General : H.R. 3289. Fiscal 2004 Supplemental Appropriations for Iraq and Afghanistan/Vote to Allow Consideration of the Rules of Debate for the Bush Administration's $87 Billion Supplemental Spending Request for Costs Associated with Military Actions in Iraq and Afghanistan. (2003 house Roll Call 544)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
H.R. 3289. Fiscal 2004 Supplemental Appropriations for Iraq and Afghanistan/Vote to Allow Consideration of the Rules of Debate for the Bush Administration's $87 Billion Supplemental Spending Request for Costs Associated with Military Actions in Iraq and Afghanistan.
house Roll Call 544     Oct 16, 2003
Member's Vote
(progressive
or not)
Progressive Position
Progressive Result
(win or loss)

In its 2004 budget request to Congress, the Bush Administration failed to include funding for military actions and reconstruction efforts in both Iraq and Afghanistan. In response to this omission, Democrats chastised the White House for submitting a budget which, in their view, failed to accurately reflect the true costs of military involvement in those two countries. Some lawmakers-most notably Senator Robert Byrd (D-WV) and Representative David Obey (D-WI)-even accused the Bush Administration of purposely misleading the American public about the cost of war in order to maintain support among the electorate. After the president's budget had been approved by Congress, the White House drafted an $87 billion supplemental spending request to pay for military actions in Iraq and Afghanistan. The subject of this vote was a motion to order the previous question-a procedural motion which ends debate and the possibility of amendment-on the rules of debate for the $87 billion supplemental spending bill for Iraq and Afghanistan. Progressives voted in opposition to the motion based on their objections to the underlying supplemental spending request. In their view, the supplemental request would create a financial burden for future U.S. taxpayers because, by failing to include revenue-generating mechanisms to pay for military involvement, the U.S. government would be forced to borrow huge sums of money to pay for military actions. That borrowed money, Progressives noted, would have to be repaid by future generations. Conservatives voted in favor of the motion to proceed based on their support for President Bush's supplemental spending request. On a vote of 221-202, the motion to proceed to a vote on the rules of debate for the supplemental spending request was adopted.

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Issue Areas:
Key: Y=Yea, N=Nay, W=Win, L=Loss