What: All Issues : Aid to Less Advantaged People, at Home & Abroad : America's Poor : H.R. 2622. Credit Reporting/Vote to Preempt State Laws Governing Consumer Access to Credit Reports. (2003 house Roll Call 498)
 Who: All Members : New York, District 2 : King, Pete
[POW!]
 
H.R. 2622. Credit Reporting/Vote to Preempt State Laws Governing Consumer Access to Credit Reports.
house Roll Call 498     Sep 10, 2003
Member's Vote
(progressive
or not)
Progressive Position
Progressive Result
(win or loss)

One important issue raised during debate on legislation to extend the Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1996 involved the preemption of states laws involving credit reporting. That issue was raised in the form of an amendment offered by Congressman Ney (R-OH) which would prevent states from enacting new laws governing consumer access to their credit reports. Progressives opposed Ney's amendment because, in their view, state legislatures and governors should be able to enact more consumer-friendly credit laws on behalf of citizens of their state even if those laws are more generous to consumers than the federal standards. Georgia and Colorado, Progressives noted, already provide consumers with greater access to their credit reports. Those laws and all future pro-consumer credit laws, Progressives argued, would be preempted by federal laws if the Ney amendment was enacted. Conservatives countered that existing federal standards governing access to credit reports already provide consumers with free credit reports from the three major credit reporting firms. The introduction of non-uniform state laws, Conservatives continued, would complicate matters for credit reporting agencies and would increase the cost of generating a credit report. The Ney amendment was adopted on a 233-189 vote and the overriding of state laws by the federal one was added to the underlying credit reporting bill.

Y N L
Issue Areas:
Key: Y=Yea, N=Nay, W=Win, L=Loss